Note:  Suprapubic tubes were used routinely with the previous generation of bladder suspension procedures, but are rarely used today.  Please see our information about sling procedures and female incontinence.

Suprapubic Tube Instructions after your bladder suspension
Dear Patient,

The day after you are discharged from the hospital, start bladder training.

Step 1:  Apply the clamp given to you on the "X" marked on the catheter.





Step 2:  Start drinking fluids.   When you feel the urge to urinate, go to the bathroom and try to urinate.  There is a 75% chance you will be able to urinate right away, even though slowly or not completely. This is normal because the bladder is still weak from surgery and it will get better as the bladder muscle gets stronger.

Step 3:  After you are finished urinating, open the clamp and let the urine drain in the leg bag.  Get an idea about the amount of the residual urine drained.

Step 4:  Reclamp the catheter.  Continue measuring residuals. Once the residuals become low (less than 2 ounces, or 60 cc), keep the catheter clamped all the time.  The catheter needs to be clamped completely for 2 days (day and night) before it can be removed by your doctor.

In case you cannot urinate right away, please DO NOT PANIC.  This is not unusual.  All it means is that your bladder needs a little more time to start working.  Just drain the bladder, leave the catheter open for 2 to 3 hours, and then retry the steps above.
THESE INSTRUCTIONS APPLY ONLY IF YOU HAVE A SUPRAPUBIC TUBE, WHICH IS A CATHETER THAT COMES OUT YOUR LOWER ABDOMEN.   MANY PATIENTS WILL HAVE NO CATHETER AT ALL, OR A CATHETER COMING OUT THE URETHRA.
Dr. Garo M. Tertzakian MD
Dr. Matthew L. Greenberger MD
Dr. William F. Pearce MD

Associated Urologists of Orange County

Doctors specializing in Urology with expertise in incontinence, bladder suspension ("bladder lift") and urethral sling procedures, kidney stones, no needle no scalpel vasectomy, vasectomy reversal orange county, laparoscopy and laparoscopic kidney and prostate surgery, prostate diseases including prostate cancer and enlarged prostate (BPH), cryoablation (or cryotherapy) of prostate and kidney, robotic (da Vinci) prostate surgery. Associated Urologists of Orange County strive to be the best urology doctors in the Orange County area.  Urologists upholding AUA Best Practice Guidelines.

Adult and pediatric urology, urologic surgery, in Orange County, California
serving Anaheim, Garden Grove, Irvine, Orange, Santa Ana and Tustin.


Our office accepts most major insurance including Aetna, Anthem Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Cigna, Health Net, Pacificare, United Health, Medicare.

The information on this site is solely for purposes of general patient education, and may not be relied upon as a substitute for professional medical care. Consult your own physician for evaluation and treatment of your specific condition.


1801 N Broadway, Santa Ana, California 92706
Phone:  (714) 639-1915


www.OCurology.com
www.UrologyOrangeCounty.com
www.UrologistOrangeCounty.com
www.OrangeCountyUrologist.com

Associated Urologists of Orange County
State-of-the-Art
UROLOGY AND UROLOGIC SURGERY
In a Minimally Invasive Way